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Vajrayana

One-pointedness

The correct practice of shamatha further and further strengthens [the] alert quality. It transforms into an increasing sense of being awake. Meanwhile, the mindful quality becomes more and more mindful, so that it requires less and less effort. You are just naturally mindful, naturally present. And the sense of being settled, of dwelling in the …

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The purpose of shamatha

The purpose of shamatha is to improve our presence of mind. We all have an innate ability to pay attention, to know. To improve upon this presence, to make it steady instead of being scattered and distracted, we try to remain attentive in a stable way. Fearless Simplicity, p. 66 Shamatha has three components: being …

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Practice right there

In Tibet, there is a small mammal, a predator that eats mice and other small rodents. When it wants to catch a mouse, it sits at the entrance to the mouse hole as if it is meditating and waits. Then, when a mouse sticks its head out, the bigger creature grabs it. ‘There must be …

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Love for all sentient beings

If you do not know that you are distracted, several hours can pass by without realizing that you are distracted. Conduct joins you to the path through the function of mindfulness and the kind of conduct that joins you to the path through mindfulness with effort is called ‘conduct that is connected with a view.’ …

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Devotion, compassion, and intelligence

The three qualities—devotion, compassion, and intelligence—should come about    naturally. Although you may not have much attachment, anger, or stupidity, the absence of the three qualities is a sign that you might be doing ‘freeze training.’ If the three qualities do not come easily, from time to time you have to manufacture them. Sometimes remain in …

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Meditation

Sometimes people say, ‘I am going through a hard time right now, but after two more years, I will retire and become a dedicated meditator.’ This way of thinking is actually a deceptive form of laziness. If you obey this thought, you will wait two years before practicing in earnest. Then, after two years have …

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Clinging

What is the difference between the real state of rigpa and the imitation? Check whether or not there is any clinging, any sense of keeping hold of something. With conceptual rigpa you notice a sense of trying to keep a state, trying to maintain a state, trying to nurture a state. There is a sense …

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Undistracted and not meditating

There are two important words that may sound a little crazy, but I want you to listen carefully to them: undistracted and not meditating. Undistracted nonmeditation. These two words together actually form one essential expression. Undistracted nonmeditation. To hear this phrase and to understand the vital point communicated through these two words, we need to …

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Wake up into rigpa

Please rest continuously in the pure view . . . self-arising rigpa. How do you do that? Neither blocking off the five sense consciousnesses, nor sending the internal awareness out to external, fixated objects, rest in the first moment, in the present awareness that arises as unhindered clarity. Meditate by staying in an all-pervasive state: …

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Emptiness, clarity, and rigpa

When you involve yourself with recognition, there are three topics—view, meditation, and conduct. What is the view? The knowing, the recognizing, right within one instant, of the mind’s emptiness and clarity unified is called the view. When, in just one moment, emptiness, clarity, and the two unified are all there together, that is rigpa. This …

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